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tatsu15

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Reply with quote  #1 
I understand blueberries are not nightshade but they contain solanine? How much do they contain? I let my toddler eat them everyday thinking it is good for her brain development... Is there a way to neutralize the solanine levels in blueberries? Do all blueberries contain solanine? What about wild blueberries?
ronmauldin

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Reply with quote  #2 
I seriously doubt that there is enough Solanine in blueberries to hurt a toddler... unless he has a proven sensitivity to solanine.
When I was young, I ate tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, peppers, okra, blueberries, artichokes and other foods laced with solanine... with no problems. However, in my fifties, I suspect my liver did not filter as well and I developed solanine inflammation issues associated with both bone spurs and arthritis.
Ron

ronmauldin

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Reply with quote  #3 
I seriously doubt that there is enough Solanine in blueberries to hurt a toddler... unless he has a proven sensitivity to solanine.
When I was young, I ate tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, peppers, okra, blueberries, artichokes and other foods laced with solanine... with no problems. However, in my fifties, I suspect my liver did not filter as well and I developed solanine inflammation issues associated with both bone spurs and arthritis.
Ron

JenLamSis

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Reply with quote  #4 
I can't eat blueberries anymore.  Even the amount found in a muffin can cause my muscles to start constricting painfully, larger amounts cause joint pain.  Apples, artichoke, okra, blueberries and possibly coconut are the non-nightshade foods that cause the same reactions as nightshades.
integralvision

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Reply with quote  #5 

Does anyone have credible scientific references about how much solanine is in blueberries? 

So far, it is widely rumored and a couple of people have written that they had a bad reaction to blueberries.
So far, no scientific evidence of any solanine being found in Blueberries.
You can email me at dreambody@igc.org - hopeully with a well documented link.
Thanks for your interest.



 


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Fred Cook

JenLamSis

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Reply with quote  #6 
Integralvision-I emailed you and received a response that it went to spam
kknd

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Reply with quote  #7 
There is probably no solanine in blueberries. I think the problem is that they use many pesticides during cultivation. Read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blueberry under Pesticides
KA

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Reply with quote  #8 
I had pain response after eating organic blueberries yesterday.  It wasn't until researching nightshade/solanine herbs today that I discovered the possibility of solanine in blueberries.  Trying to increase my polyphenols to help with inflammation, blueberries are now off my grocery list.
JenLamSis

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Reply with quote  #9 
I have also tried eating organic and wild blueberries and still have a painful reaction, so KKND's comment that it is probably just pesticides is not correct.

I have exactly the same reaction that I have eating nightshades when I eat these non-nightshades: blueberries, blackberries, apples, artichoke, okra.

I also had a terrible reaction after eating a lot of beets at a restaurant once, and haven't tried them since to confirm that was what I reacted to.
kknd

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Reply with quote  #10 
I'm intolerant to nightshades and I ate wild blueberries a few times. I did not have any reaction to them... I can eat blackberries and apples without any reaction also. So it might be something else in those fruits that is bothering some people and I'm quite sure that it is not solanine or chaconine (believe me I would know).
JenLamSis

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Reply with quote  #11 
I tried several years ago to find research on non-nightshades that contain solanine. I spent hours and weeks researching on PubMed until my head was spinning and also contacted nutritional scientists around the country. I was unable to find any proven information about blueberries, but a food scientist with University of Connecticut that I talked to and emailed confirmed that apples do have solanine, and I also found several references in scientific literature for apples.

Reactions might depend on quantities absorbed or a persons's sensitivity.

I went on a 100% plant-based diet many years ago to try to improve psoriatic arthritis symptoms, and was flooding myself with nightshades before I recognized my new intolerance and found this website. I was practically paralyzed, on the couch for hours a day, wrapped in ice packs. I assumed my arthritis was just getting worse.

In October that same year, I added several apples a day to my diet, as we pick Macouns locally. For the first time, my hands were affected and I couldn't hold a pen to sign my name. I knew something was different, and that was when I went back to the computer and discovered nightshade intolerance. Luckily, that same year, I also kept a daily food diary from Jan-Oct, and could go back and match my diet to increased therapy and doctor's appointments, prescription use, days laid up in pain, etc. 

I used to pick 50-100 lbs of blueberries locally and stock a huge freezer. I tried to switch to bags of frozen organic, wild berries, but it hasn't helped. I was consuming 1-2 cups a day in smoothies and frozen fruit sorbets. It was only last summer, after 5 years of known nightshade intolerance, when a friend had a bumper crop of organic blackberries and I was eating 1-2 cups a day that I recognized that I had the same muscle contraction and pain reaction.

We can't assume that everyone reacts the same way to solanine and other gylcoalkaloids, or it is always these compounds.

But for me, diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, I know I react to nightshades, apples, blueberries, blackberries, artichoke, okra, coconut (and possibly beets-the one time I ate 2 cups of beet salad for lunch I was in agony all night long, awake to 4 am, again covered in ice packs. I haven't been brave enough to experiment and repeat.)

Over the past year, I find pain is increased the day after consuming dairy products.






kknd

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Reply with quote  #12 
Sorry but I don't believe there is any solanine in apples. I can't find any relevant proof on that online. There are some papers that state they contain solanine, but the source of their statement is some research that can't be found online. Also there is nothing about solanine and apples on wikipedia. The mistake probably comes from thornapples (Datura stramonium) the same way as some state cherries (which are really ground cherries-Physalis). I don't believe any food scientists that use google as their source and don't have any real research to quote. So there is no scientific proof of solanine in any plant or fruit outside of solanaceae family. If you find any original articles please paste links here.
Also I eat apples almost on daily basis and drink 100% apple juice daily. I also eat blueberries, sugar (sugar beets) and cherries. If there would be any solanine in them my symptoms and inflammation would not get better. But it does, so...
Laterra

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Reply with quote  #13 
JenLamSis,

Re dairy, I have issues with some kinds of cheese and cream cheese. When I first discovered my sensitivities to nightshades, I switched to organic foods as much as possible, but even some organic dairy products still cause me pain.

I found that I am ok with Kerrygold butter and cheese, but I have to stay away from US cheeses for the most part. For milk I use Organic Valley grass-fed milk and Grassmilk. 



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